Careers

Careers, Communication, Growing Your Business, Women in Business

#girlblog

How did you react to the “#girlblog” title? Maybe you smiled. Or maybe you thought, “Who is she calling a “girl” … and why? Or maybe you shrugged and moved on. Your response may well depend on your age. And your familiarity with TikTok. We’ve seen a wave of #girl the past few months. Girl dinners, random food from the fridge, eaten alone, possibly standing over the sink. Hot girl walks, taken without a companion and without regard to how the walker looks. Even girl rotting, which seems to mean lying around your room doing nothing for hours on end. Young women have shared images of their girl moments on social media. Eating, walking, or lounging, what they have in common the absence of male participation. Thus #girl. For many of us, “girl” has long felt insulting or patronizing. As full-grown adult women, we want to be seen as equals to our male counterparts, not children to be patted on the head and indulged. Or dismissed.

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photo of Catherine Johns on the first day of kindergarten
Business Communication, Careers

Remember Your First Work Friend?

When was the last time you called to touch base with a friend for no reason at all? Or you sent a text with no mission in mind other than to let someone know you were thinking of them? Or you shot off a quick email, just to say hi? You might guess those random contacts would be unwelcome interruptions in their busy day. Who has time to respond to a quick hello, a remark about the weather, or a waving emoji? Turns out if that’s your assumption, you’re mistaken. (And I was right there with you.)

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color photo of Catherine Johns and two of her first work friends in 1987
Business Communication, Careers

Are People The Problem?

You might call them clients. Customers. Users. Patients. Or patrons. Whatever we call them, most of us serve somebody with the product we produce or the service we provide. Some of us come face to face with the people we serve in what are often called “front line positions.” The analyses of the Great Resignation point to a quest for higher pay, better hours, and more stability as people decide it’s time to move on. They’re leaving the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries in particular, in unprecedented numbers. While some critics grumble about lazy workers coasting on unemployment and pandemic relief payments, most experts say the 40-million or so people who quit their jobs last year are not sitting around today eating bonbons. They’re back at work. Something's wrong ...

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photo of stressed office workers arguing